The Epistle to the Hebrews

You can find the book on Amazon here.

Above is a free pdf of the commentary, constructed Pharr-style and outfitted with some new additions (Index of Names and Places and an Expanded Dictionary). This is presented together with a running vocabularly of the book before and a plain Greek Text after (PDFs available upon request). To address the issue of an outdated text (Westcott and Hort’s in the public domain), I have made a list of all signficant deviations from the most up-to-date scholarly text (NA-28/UBS5). There are in addition about a dozen morphological and grammatical boxes, concentrated rather in the second half for efficient review of the book’s prominent features.

The physical copy differs somewhat from the Augustine commentary, as I have added 1 inch to the book (to width and height). This came as a compromise between two goals: making the book portable and making it more useful to students. Since it was thought fitting to give margin space in a book oriented toward classroom use and study, I opted for the feel and utility of a text-book. Another benefit is that the book now can lay open without breaking the spine (as is the case with smaller books). In future works much larger than this one the size will prove to the advantage of students.

Due to time and technical restraints I have put the Patristic Catena off to a second edition (though it will likely first be seen in a commentary on John’s Epistles).

Constructive criticism is always welcome! Please send questions and corrections to me at my email (my name as in the url @gmail.com).

Please share with friends and colleagues so that more people can enjoy the Greek New Testament in the original language. Thanks in advance for your support!

Links and Resources: The references throughout are to the commentary of Brooke Foss Westcott (noted ‘W.’), available here for download as well as to the four volumes of the monumental Grammar of Moulton (or Moulton-Turner, labeled according to volume, i.e., I, II, III, IV), and Smyth’s Greek Grammar (on Perseus). Another useful commentary in the public domain is that of James Moffat, available here. For more see the Further Resources page in the commentary.

But as it is, they desire a greater land, a heavenly one. Wherefore God is not ashamed to be called of them God, since he had built for them a city.

The Epistle to the Hebrews, xi. 16
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